Cartesian Coordinates – Summer 2016

Our Summer 2016 edition of Cartesian Coordinates focuses on communications networks.

In this issue, learn about the next evolution in cable with the transition to DOCSIS 3.1, receive best practice advice on how to handle a complex network transformation, and understand the operator vision behind SDN/NFV migration with LSO. Get these and more in our latest newsletter.

In the Summer 2016 issue:

  • Featured Insight: Network Transformation – Best Practices for Success by Dr Ron Angner
  • 2016 Industry Predictions Update: Latest developments on SDN deployment, legacy voice decommissioning and shut-down of 2G
  • Expert Interview with Rick Gasloli on the Next Evolution in Cable: Preparing for DOCSIS 3.1
  • Client Challenge:  Retaining Customers through SDH Network Platform Transition by Vito Morawetz

Coordinates is Cartesian’s quarterly newsletter – a mix of industry analysis, expert insight and company news

Cartesian's Coordinates Summer 2016 issue
Download Cartesian’s Summer 2016 issue

Excerpt from Expert Interview with Rick Gasloli – Next Evolution in Cable: Preparing for DOCSIS 3.1

“Twenty years ago the average HFC network was delivering approximately 80 channels of television and a 1.5Mbps internet service.  Today, that same network architecture is delivering hundreds of channels of HD, On-Demand video, Internet speeds in access of 100Mbps, telephone services, and more.”

Your background is in cable. What was one of your earliest experiences in the field?

I joined Comcast’s Online group in 1997, as Director of Online Engineering, to help launch high-speed data. This involved upgrading the HFC (hybrid-fiber coax) plant for two-way operation, coordinating market launches with our partner, the @Home Network, and making sure our technicians were prepared with the knowledge and tools to connect customer’s personal computers to the network. While we take it for granted today, it was not a trivial task to connect a computer to the Internet in the late nineties. The other thing I remember is launching an entire market with four T-1s (1.5Mbps) to the Internet. Today, the home of every cable customer has more than that!

How has the cable industry evolved?

Wow! How hasn’t it? The cable industry has evolved from its humble beginnings of connecting a few homes to a community antenna so they could receive a better television picture to one that is operating some of the highest-performance broadband networks on the planet serving many millions of customers and billions of interactions every day. As long as we are talking about evolving, I think a special call-out to the HFC network is in order; after all it, is what makes cable, cable. Twenty years ago the average HFC network was delivering approximately 80 channels of television and a 1.5Mbps Internet service. Today that same network architecture is delivering hundreds of channels of HD, On-Demand video, Internet speeds in access of 100Mbps, telephone services, and more. This is in large part due to innovations like digital video, advanced video multiplexing, and DOCSIS. With new technologies like DOCSIS 3.1, Remote PHY and passive, fiber-deep nodes, the HFC network will be providing new and enhanced services for many, many years to come.

What are you most excited about for the future of cable?

I think I am most excited about cable’s opportunity to become the aggregator for all experiences in the home.  In addition to voice, video, and data services, cable is perfectly positioned to facilitate the access to services like energy management, medical monitoring, and connected-home services. Cable will be an engine for the Internet of Things.

> Continue reading “Next Evolution in Cable” in Cartesian Coordinates – Summer 2016

Download Cartesian Coordinates Newsletter - Summer 2016 (1 MB PDF)